Breed of the Week: Mottled Orpington

Mottled Orpingtons are beautiful, gentle giants.​

​A newer and rarer type of Orpington, Mottled Orpingtons have the same huge gorgeous body type as other Orpingtons but with stunning black and white feathering.  They lay a large light to medium brown egg.  They are a very large bird, and are considered dual purpose.  This means they are slow growing, taking much longer to reach their full size than similarly aged smaller, lighter breeds.  But their showy markings make them stand out in any flock!

We have purchased stock from 3 sources and have chosen the best ones to be our breeding stock.  We will continue to select for pure mottling in our breeding pen, with no red bleedthrough as is a common problem in the US mottled lines.  Our Mottled Orpingtons are English type/lines.

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$16.00

One day old Mottled Orpington chick, straight run.  When grown Mottled Orpingtons lay a large light to medium brown egg.  They are a very large bird, and are considered dual purpose.  This means they are slow growing, taking much longer to reach their full size than similarly aged smaller, lighter breeds.  But their showy markings make them stand out in any flock!

$4.75

One Mottled Orpington hatching egg. When grown Mottled Orpingtons lay a large light to medium brown egg.  They are a very large bird, and are considered dual purpose.  This means they are slow growing, taking much longer to reach their full size than similarly aged smaller, lighter breeds.  But their showy markings make them stand out in any flock!

$55.00

One dozen (12) Mottled Orpington hatching eggs. When grown Mottled Orpingtons lay a large light to medium brown egg.  They are a very large bird, and are considered dual purpose.  This means they are slow growing, taking much longer to reach their full size than similarly aged smaller, lighter breeds.  But their showy markings make them stand out in any flock!

The cockerel above is quite young, under a year.  Each time they molt they gain more white. You can see this below in the older hen on the left compared with the pullet on the right.

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